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Brittle Paper Is Releasing A Collection of Africanfuturism Stories Written By Nnedi Okorafor, TL Huchu, And More

The entire anthology, featuring eight unique stories, will be available as a free download on October 19th.

The African literary culture magazine Brittle Paper will be publishing a collection of Africanfuturism stories as part of their Decade Project which celebrates the company’s 10 year anniversary. Africanfuturism was birthed by Nigerian-American author Nnedi Okorafor, and relates to science fiction that is rooted in the African world as opposed to Western society. 

This special anthology of stories is the first time that one titled Africanfuturism is being published. Author Wole Talabi, who edited the collection, details the stories to be focused on the African experience, “hopes and fears, exploring African sciences, philosophies and adaptations to technology and visions of the future centered on, or spiraling out of, Africa.” And although each story has its own tone and style, they all capture the true elements of Africanfuturism. 

The eight stories are by Nnedi Okorafor, TL Huchu, Dilman Dila, Rafeeat Aliyu, Tlotlo Tsamaase, Mame Bougouma Diene, Mazi Nwonwu, and Derek Lubangakene. Each will be released through Brittle Paper on a given date next week, from October 12th to the 18th. On October 19th, the full anthology will be available as a free download. See the publication schedule below: 

(October 12)

Egoli by T.L. Huchu

Sunrise by Nnedi Okorafor

(October 14)

Yat Madit by Dilman Dila

Rainmaker by Mazi Nwonwu

(October 16)

Behind Our Irises by Tlotlo Tsamaase

Fort Kwame by Derek Lubangakene

(October 18)

Fruit of the Calabash by Rafeeat Aliyu

Lekki Lekki by Mame Bougouma Diene

Visit brittlepaper.com to stay informed about each release. 

Ayanna Nicole

Hi! I’m Ayanna, a 26-year-old writer and artist. Although I graduated from The University of North Carolina at Charlotte with two degrees in art and psychology, I’ve had a passion for writing for as long as I can remember. By following my dreams and utilizing my creativity, I designed Jaro Magazine with the ultimate intention of bringing more positive stories in the black community to the forefront, while also highlighting our versatile and vibrant culture through Jaro’s four modes: film, books, art, and music. I’m into spirituality, nature walks, music festivals, poetry, traveling without a destination in mind, painting, and discussing everything out of the ordinary with other curious minds. Also, I'm an INFP!

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